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God by any Other Name

This morning, I woke up and checked the news for any report on the box office of my husband’s most recent film, God’s Not Dead, which opened last night. Imagine my surprise to find that, not only is it tracking to earn better than 50% more than initially expected, but the article in Variety failed to even mention one of the stars of the film. This is tremendously odd, because this same actor played the title role of at one time the most-watched television show in the world, and a pivotal supporting role in the smash hit Soul Surfer, and is a man who is recognized by people on the street, by name, world-wide. Of course, it’s

Kevin Sorbo

There, I wrote it – it’s not a swear word or a “banned” word (like Sheryl Sandberg’s “bossy”), it’s the name of the actor in the film that is “co-starring Shane Harper,” as Variety reports. The Variety article also mentions that Willie Robertson appears in the film, but of my hubby, who does an outstanding job portraying an angry atheist, Variety says nothing. Nada. Bupkiss. Zip.

Actor Kevin Sorbo plays (Image source: "God's Not Dead"/YouTube)

Actor Kevin Sorbo plays Professor Radisson in “God’s Not Dead.” (Image source: “God’s Not Dead”/YouTube)

I wondered, could there be an agenda driving this lack of commentary (ignorance, in the truest sense of the word)?

The second sentence of the article gives it away. “Shailene Woodley’s “Divergent” might be the No. 1 film in America but faith-based audiences are once again proving to be anything but conservative at the U.S. box office.” (Emphasis mine.)

Observe, if you are going to see Christian films, you simply must be a leftist! (You must be one of us!) Apparently, at Variety, at least, conservative is the new liberal. That’s the same kind of logic that gave us “job-locked” and “What difference, at this point, does it make?”

It’s clear, from Bill Maher’s recent rant against God to the reviews of God’s Not Dead, that Hollywood doesn’t like Christianity. The Hollywood Reporter’s reviewer, Steven Farber, actually criticizes the film on the basis that, “It cheapens the issues to suggest that anyone who doubts the existence of God came to that conclusion because of a personal trauma.” Farber believes, apparently, that all atheists simply evolved, lazily coming to the assumption there is no God, from no particular causation, similar to the  atheistic belief that the entire world came about by pure accident.

I tried to ignore his swiss-cheese logic, but as a co-author of The Answer: Proof of God in Heaven, a book based on the incredible logic of the universe, I cannot. For instance, when Farber says of the subplot, “a Muslim girl who defies her overbearing father by embracing Christianity… is seriously offensive in suggesting that Muslims are the only religious group intolerant of other faiths.” Does he believe that every Hollywood movie in which the priest or the cop turns out to be the bad-guy intends to portray ALL priests and cops as bad-guys? (Or does he believe they all are, and therefore is goes unremarked?)

Farber continues: “As the title and the producing entity suggest, the film is clearly designed as propaganda to counter Hollywood’s more typical ‘godless’ efforts.” While accusing the filmmakers, Farber reveals he is not above propagandizing, himself. He unwittingly exposes his abject bias by reporting, “On the first day of class, the haughty Professor Radisson (Kevin Sorbo) asks that all students sign a paper affirming that ‘God Is Dead,’ so that he will not have to spend time arguing with traditional believers. Josh refuses to sign, and the professor reluctantly offers to let him have a portion of three classes to try to win the other students over to his devout point of view.” (Emphasis mine.)

In fact, the professor happily goads Josh, demanding, insisting and requiring that the student present his own argument, saying, “I’m going to enjoy failing you!” This atheist professor is anything but “reluctant.” Neither was Bill Maher, who haughtily said, “No one can blame me when I say this is a stupid country. When 60 percent of the adults in it think the Noah’s Ark story is literally true.”

Bill Maher may make his arrogant comments and court of public opinion will issue judgement, pending the final one, of course. Kevin Sorbo is a also man who stands resolutely in defense of his faith and his freedom to express it. Having survived a major health crisis at the age of thirty-eight, he understands the value of faith. He told TheBlaze he hopes the film shows skeptics that “there might be something greater out there.” Sorbo is neither reluctant nor haughty.

Many atheists, and apparently many Hollywood types, are reluctant.  They don’t want to be bothered:  to think about God,  to defend their positions, to speak of any of this. And it bothers them that a film, the very name of which they find outrageously offensive, is performing exceedingly well. Perhaps they see too much of themselves in the professor’s character. So, just like the nasty professor, who started his class by ending the discussion, they intend to do that in the media surrounding this film as well. The difference is, the professor accused his adversary by name. But in more cowardly fashion, Variety begins their discussion of the success of God’s Not Dead by not deigning to mention KEVIN SORBO by name.

*** Since our posting this article, Variety has stealthily modified the content of their article to include Sorbo’s name at the very end. They have just perfected the Gaslighting Technique.

Timing

Sometimes it takes a while for the right message to spread, especially through a complacent, distracted populous, but the message is there waiting when they are ready.

Last week I was invited to come on The Dana Loesch Show for The Blaze TV, to speak about home schooling. I’ve been an advocate for years, but with the advent of Common Core, the stakes are higher and the debate has intensified, so I will grasp any opportunity to get my message to those who need to hear it.

Earlier in the week, I was questioned directly after church by another church-goer as to why I advocate so strongly for home schooling. It was crowded and noisy after the service, and I had to come up with a succinct, to-the-point answer for my curious friend. “I don’t believe an institution is the best place for any child,” I answered. This crystalized my passion for children better than I had ever done previously, and the timing for my epiphany was impeccable.

On Dana’s show, I managed to expound more on that analysis. It boils down to the fact that our society has been brainwashed to believe that teachers have cornered the market on education, that institutional education is the best way to accomplish – what, exactly? Conformity and indoctrination, of course. Progressive, liberal, ideological indoctrination, masquerading as the government’s  care and consideration for your children. The government doesn’t care, and the sooner you disabuse yourself of patently false notions, the better off you and your children will be. This government doesn’t even care enough about its bottom line to encourage people to work, even for its own tax revenues. Witness the outrageous job-loss concordant with the implementation of Obamacare and the invention of the phrase “job-locked” to excuse it away. And we are supposed to trust these people with our precious children?

I got an email from an acquaintance, asking to speak to me about her daughter. We had met briefly a few years ago at a social event. She found my number through a mutual friend. Her daughter, Jane, was rebelling against going to school. Jane would cry and find excuses to avoid going to junior high each day, and her grades reflected her frustration. A superintendent-type at the school had suggested taking Jane out of the system, doing a kind of public school home study with her. This way, the school could retain the child’s funds, but be absolved of responsibility. Clever plan. Unfortunately, or rather, fortunately for the girl, that program was full and the mom was seeking alternate options.

Mom began our phone call saying she could never home school her daughter. Inside, I crumpled. But I am an eternal optimist. We chatted for a while about the situation. She divulged that when she told Jane to study for social studies, for instance, the girl would answer, “I don’t know how to study!” Imagine that! They don’t actually teach them how to study in an institution designed for that purpose! I confided that as a public schooled youngster, it took me until my first year at Duke to learn how to study (from a fellow classmate, mind you). I explained that the system – the institution – had failed Jane, and I believed the worst thing for Jane would be to dump her in another institution. “But I haven’t a clue about how to home school,” was Mom’s answer. 

I pursue a classical Christian education for my kids, but there are a plethora of other options out there for parents, and resources for those new to schooling. We explored options for her, and she finally realized that she was not as impotent as our system wanted her to believe. As I educated her on what her best choices might be, a shift came over her and she brightened. She said, “Wow, I think this might be the best thing for our relationship, actually. I can take her out of school, cover the basics, and teach her how to enjoy learning again.” I smiled. Sure, it had been two years since I had first blabbed to her about home schooling, but sometime it takes that long for the message to hit home.

Ultimately, the goal of education is to show the child how to teach themselves, to equip them so they can satisfy their innate love of learning – for the rest of their lives. Too often we see that brick and mortar schools ‘teach’ quite the opposite. With the advent of the internet, great educational materials are mere clicks away – even the classics are all at the library.

My message is resonating with people more now because the battle has intensified. Common Core is awakening parents in ways I couldn’t have dreamed. They are now positioning for defense of their children. It’s high time.

Dear Mr. David Silverman,
Thank you for the recent debate you and my co-author engaged in on Fox, regarding your placement of a billboard in Times Square announcing “Take the Christ out of Christmas.” It was interesting to hear your point of view, which boils down to you protecting others from their religion. “Christmas is fun, except for the church stuff, so just leave that out of it.”
Having been raised an atheist Jew, much like yourself, I can completely understand your position and your erroneous interpretation of religion – Christianity, to be precise – as punitive and destructive, something to rescue others from. I also know that once I proved to myself the existence of a Holy and Righteous Creator, my fear dissipated and I became a much happier person. Religion, far from being constricting and burdensome, as you believe, set me free to enjoy my life.
Sadly, you admit to never having attended church, so you couldn’t possibly know. How many professionals did you speak to before concluding the entire profession was wrong? In any case we know you are not alone. We all know people who are disappointed in God and Church, like you. You represent them, childishly daring an omnipotent God, who graciously endowed his creation, humankind, with free choice, to make a believer of you.
After I prayed for you, I began to wonder if God wasn’t actually simply working through you, in His attempt to reach you and many more. I’ve concluded that we believers owe you a debt of gratitude. You are serving God in placing that billboard, which, by denigrating both Christ and anyone who worships Christ, proves only the opposite – that there would be no Christmas without Christ, and that after 2000 years, Christ is still stirring hearts and minds.
Marius mentioned that Christmas is like the celebration of a friend’s birthday, but He isn’t just any friend. We celebrate the life of a hero who died, a Savior who sacrificed His life for us, to whom we owe our very freedom in this Judeo-Christian country. Your billboard spits on His grave, His memory. To that end, you are bringing great attention to Him who saved us, and you were chosen especially by God to do this work. You represent and speak to the rebellious, scared and unhappy (the atheists) very well, something our book, The Answer: Proof of God in Heaven, is also meant to do. You show them the truth – that without Christ the “Holy day” is just an empty celebration of nothingness, much like an atheist’s entire life appears to him, meaningless and truly depressing.
You are doing more on behalf Christ than many. Thank you, and may God continue to bless your work, and may God’s love fill your heart this Christmas.

‘A’ for Average!

At some colleges over 50% of the grades given are A’s. And while students may be happy, it begs the question: What does an A grade mean?

Well, this is not terribly surprising. As we move toward a more pure entitlement society, it is no wonder we are becoming more and more accustomed to rewarding nothing. “I deserve it,” is the new mantra – with no reason necessary. Trophies for ninth place, and ribbons for “participation.”

Now we see it in our teaching institutions. But here’s an interesting point:

Subject matters as well. Mathematics departments tend to grade more rigorously than liberal arts. The easiest subject? Education, where 71 percent of all grades are ‘A’s.

You think your kid’s teachers are really well-educated? They took the ‘easiest’ classes, giving proof to the old adage that those who can’t, teach.

Numerous studies have found that today’s average young person thinks he possesses above-average intelligence.

Julia Twenge, a psychologist and author of the book Generation Me, in a previous statement to The DC News Foundation, wrote, “Students are getting better grades for less work, which is probably one reason why they feel so confident.”

The trend of self-delusion among teenagers is a particularly American problem, Kosakowski noted.

“The only things our kids rank the highest in are confidence in their abilities,” he said. “Math, science, and everything else has gone down.”

The underlying question the articles on this don’t attack are whether students really are “happier.”

In a fair grading system, you reward people for their outstanding achievements,” said Rojstaczer. Grade inflation “lowers the intensity and intellectual level in many classes.”

If you don’t have to work for it, can obtaining it really make you happy, long term? These institutions, and society in general, are robbing individuals of their potential joy, by patronizing and coddling them until there is nothing else to do but submit to mediocracy.

Common Core Porn

Below are photos of a test issued to an eighth-grade Louisiana child.

In case the photos are too hard to read, here’s the first question:

1. Match the type of sex to the activities associated with it.

a. penis penetrating the vagina

b. penis penetrating the anus

c. mouth and/or tongue on the penis or vulva

Options:  anal sex, vaginal sex, oral sex

There are lots of other interesting questions, like where the highest teen pregnancy rates occur, but my favorite is:

Delaying tactics are a permanent solution. (True or False)

Because sex for teens is inevitable, especially when the adults in role-model positions instruct them on the Kama Sutra in the classroom.

You’ve heard of “hard core” porn and “soft core” porn, right? This is the Common Core version.

sex ed lest LA p1 sex ed test LA p 2 sex ed test LA page3 sex ed test LA page4 sex ed test LA page5

As part of the Common Core curriculum, fifth graders are taught the United Nation’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Unsurprisingly, to those of us playing at home, it trumps the US Constitution and Bill of Rights. By these teaching standards, the United States is no longer sovereign, in any way , shape or form, just at the member nations of the UN would like things to be.

One young fifth grader brought home her aced exam, on which she had answered:

“Human rights are rights articulated by the government to uphold this country in shape. These rules are inalienable. They protect our country. The human rights are one of the most important rights ever. I think they hold this country together.”

To Britt’s surprise, the teacher gave full credit for that answer, which contradicts the Declaration of Independence, which states that individual rights derive from God, not government.

If rights are derived from the government, then it is reasonable to assume they can be rightfully taken away by the government. The government gives and the government takes away! (Except under the US Constitution, which is why we so laud it, and why young men placed themselves in harm’s way to defend it.)

If this is should come true in our country, as our children are being taught, then the IRS targeting of private citizens because of their political beliefs is not only reasonable, but necessary. How dare you question the authority that gives you the right to life, health, food, clothing and happiness, among countless other UN-annointed “human rights”? It certainly raises the government to the level of a deity, something government, in general strives for. But this kind of deity is petty and cruel, controlling and vindictive. Will you teach your child to worship at the altar of this new god? Or will you stand up and fight this power grab? Call out Common Core for what it is – indoctrination of our children to become good little servants of the state. At least under God they still have a choice. Once the state takes over, kiss your choices goodbye.

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